There are various components that come together to make up a sash window to keep it working efficiently, including sashes, the box case, sash weights, parting beads, baton rods and sash cords.

Many owners are unaware that most window sashes are counterweighted to allow for easy opening and closing.

It goes without saying that these components need to be well-maintained as they give the window its distinctive appearance. Sash cords, in particular, are passed over pulleys and attached to the side of the sash (the moveable frame that contains the glass) and they’re also connected to the sash weights inside the box case that contains the sashes.

When these cords get broken or worn down, they need to be replaced. Cord replacement in some instances (depending on the size of the window) is a two-person task and requires the sashes to be taken out of the box case.

The Process

Let’s look at how our experts here at Sash & Case Windows Direct re-cord a sash and case window:

First and foremost, we remove one of the inner baton rods, which is generally secured by screws, secret nailing or with baton rod screws.

If the cord for the top sash needs to be replaced, the joiners will pull out the parting bead on the same side as the inner baton rod that was first removed so that the sash can be released from the box case.

Next, detach the sash cords from the side of the sash and the sash is then kept to one side. But before the sash cords are removed, temporary support is provided to prevent the sash or the cord from dropping which could cause significant damage.

The weight box pocket cover that is adjacent to the damaged rope is also removed to retrieve the sash weight from the bottom of the case and clear out any debris that may have accumulated inside the weight box.

The new sash cord should be the same diameter as the old, worn down cord to prevent any snagging that may occur as it is fed through a pulley. Cotton cord is typically used as it comes pre-stretched and impregnated with wax to allow it to run smoothly and lower the risk of rot. It is advisable to opt for braided cord instead of twisted as it happens to be more durable.

Our joiners then pass an over-length section of the new cord over the pulley and inside the weight box until it can be seen at the bottom and is tied to the existing weight.

They also adjust the length of the cord that’s hanging over the pulley to make sure that when the sash is completely raised, the sash weight that’s connected to it will hang somewhere between 75 to 100mm clear of the bottom of the weight box.

This will keep the knocking noises to a minimum during operation and allow for any stretching that may occur on the sash cord. Large sash tacks are used to pull the new cord down, set it into the groove in the side of the sash, and nail it into position.

When both cords are connected, the sash is moved back into position and inspected to make sure it is working exactly how it needs to. Once done, the baton rod and parting bead are finally fixed back into position.

In Conclusion

We know this will largely be a technical read for most, but to us, this breakdown of detail and process is of the utmost importance.

Do your sash and case windows require specialist care and maintenance? Get in touch with our team of window experts here at Sash & Case Windows Direct.Com

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